Almost every day brings news of awful crimes, but some are so heinous, so horrendous and malicious, that they dwarf all else. One of those rare events took place on July 17, when Malaysian Airlines MH17 was shot down in Eastern Ukraine, killing 298 people.

The Guardian of Virtue in the White House denounced it as an “outrage of unspeakable proportions,” which happened “because of Russian support.” His UN Ambassador thundered that “when 298 civilians are killed” in the “horrific downing” of a civilian plane, “we must stop at nothing to determine who is responsible and to bring them to justice.” She also called on Putin to end his shameful efforts to evade his very clear responsibility.

True, the “irritating little man” with the “ratlike face” (Timothy Garton Ash) had called for an independent investigation, but that could only have been because of sanctions from the one country courageous enough to impose them, the United States, while Europeans cower in fear.

On CNN, former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine William Taylor assured the world that the irritating little man “is clearly responsible … for the shoot down of this airliner.” For weeks, lead stories reported the anguish of the families, details of the lives of the murdered victims, the international efforts to claim the bodies, the fury over the horrific crime that “stunned the world,” as the press reports daily in grisly detail.

Every literate person, and certainly every editor and commentator, instantly recalled another case when a plane was shot down with comparable loss of life: Iran Air 655 with 290 killed, including 66 children, shot down in Iranian airspace in a clearly identified commercial air route. The crime was not carried out “with U.S. support,” nor has its agent ever been uncertain. It was the guided-missile cruiser USS Vincennes, operating in Iranian waters in the Persian Gulf…

truth-has-a-liberal-bias

politicalmachine:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

WASHINGTON — A multi-million dollar lawsuit was filed in federal court in Missouri on Thursday, seeking compensation for “excessive force” by the police in Ferguson, Missouri, in the days after the shooting of Michael Brown.

According to the suit, the excessive force included false arrest, assault and battery; led to intentional infliction of emotional distress; was the result of negligent supervision and discipline; and resulted in a violation of the plaintiffs’ constitutional rights.

The lawsuit, filed by three out-of-state lawyers — including Malik Shabazz from Black Lawyers for Justice, who participated in the protests in Missouri — seeks multi-million dollar judgments against the City of Ferguson and St. Louis County, as well as one specific ands several unknown officers on behalf of Tracey White, Dewayne A. Matthews Jr., Kerry White, Damon Coleman, and Theophilus Green.

In addition to the city and county, the chief of both city and county police are named as defendants, as is Justin Cosma, a police officer with the Ferguson Police Department.

The underlying cause:

The underlying cause:

The general reason for the lawsuit:

The general reason for the lawsuit:

The facts underlying Tracey White’s claim:

The facts underlying Tracey White's claim:

The facts underlying Dewayne A. Matthews Jr.’s claim:

The facts underlying Dewayne A. Matthews Jr.'s claim:

The facts underlying Kerry White’s claim:

The facts underlying Kerry White's claim:

The facts underlying Damon Coleman, and Theophilus Green’s claim:

The facts underlying Damon Coleman, and Theophilus Green's claim:

Read the complaint:

Source: Chris Geidner for Buzzfeed News

PERFECT

getinvolvedyoulivehere

getinvolvedyoulivehere:

Police Issue Apology for “Racial Profiling Saves Lives” Bumper Sticker, But Not Before Lying… Read more » http://bit.ly/1nJz01c

wyldbillcody
america-wakiewakie:

Body Cam: Cop Assaults Woman for Not “Rolling Down Her Window All the Way” (Video) | The Free Thought Project 
A Police Officer’s Body Cam captured his severe over reaction on film.
On September 4, 2013, University of Central Florida (UCF) college student Victoria King was pulled over by UCFPD Officer Timothy Isaacs for a minor traffic offense – a bad tail light.
The officer became obsessed and incensed by Ms. King being reluctant to roll down her window “all the way” to receive her bad tail light ticket.
The officer then escalated the traffic stop to violence, breaking out the car window, and charging Ms. King with two felonies and a misdemeanor.
The two felonies have been abandoned by the state attorney.
All the officer had to do was hand the woman her ticket and go on about his revenue collecting. Instead he opted for a power trip.
Instead of simply citing her, he began to require the woman to obey every verbal command he gave, regardless of having a legitimate function to his issuance of the citation.
Orlando criminal defense attorney John Guidry (www.jgcrimlaw.com), sums up the officers command:

“The officer’s command to roll down the window ‘all the way’ does not sound like much of an imposition. But it is an unlawful command, and as such, it is not much different than the officer telling Ms. King to stand on her head. Stand on her head? What possible connection does that have with writing a citation for a broken tail light? Well, it has none, as does the officer’s claim that a partially rolled down window is somehow a safety concern. It is not. The officer’s order was arbitrary, is not for the safety of the officer, and, in fact, serves no purpose whatsoever.
“If Ms. King is accused of ‘resisting an officer’ for her failure to roll down her window fully, Florida Statute 843.02 requires that the officer be engaged in the legal execution of any legal duty. It would appear, then, that before Ms. King is required to obey the order of the officer, the order must be legal from the beginning. Clearly, this officer’s order was illegal, and as such, Ms. King’s charges should be dismissed.”

Here is the body cam footage in its entirety.

america-wakiewakie:

Body Cam: Cop Assaults Woman for Not “Rolling Down Her Window All the Way” (Video) | The Free Thought Project 

A Police Officer’s Body Cam captured his severe over reaction on film.

On September 4, 2013, University of Central Florida (UCF) college student Victoria King was pulled over by UCFPD Officer Timothy Isaacs for a minor traffic offense – a bad tail light.

The officer became obsessed and incensed by Ms. King being reluctant to roll down her window “all the way” to receive her bad tail light ticket.

The officer then escalated the traffic stop to violence, breaking out the car window, and charging Ms. King with two felonies and a misdemeanor.

The two felonies have been abandoned by the state attorney.

All the officer had to do was hand the woman her ticket and go on about his revenue collecting. Instead he opted for a power trip.

Instead of simply citing her, he began to require the woman to obey every verbal command he gave, regardless of having a legitimate function to his issuance of the citation.

Orlando criminal defense attorney John Guidry (www.jgcrimlaw.com), sums up the officers command:

“The officer’s command to roll down the window ‘all the way’ does not sound like much of an imposition. But it is an unlawful command, and as such, it is not much different than the officer telling Ms. King to stand on her head. Stand on her head? What possible connection does that have with writing a citation for a broken tail light? Well, it has none, as does the officer’s claim that a partially rolled down window is somehow a safety concern. It is not. The officer’s order was arbitrary, is not for the safety of the officer, and, in fact, serves no purpose whatsoever.

“If Ms. King is accused of ‘resisting an officer’ for her failure to roll down her window fully, Florida Statute 843.02 requires that the officer be engaged in the legal execution of any legal duty. It would appear, then, that before Ms. King is required to obey the order of the officer, the order must be legal from the beginning. Clearly, this officer’s order was illegal, and as such, Ms. King’s charges should be dismissed.”

Here is the body cam footage in its entirety.